Fashion / Men

Trend report: the best of Men’s Fashion Week SS 20

The boys are back in town and never before have so many eyes been glued to the runways. From Virgil Abloh’s pastel palette at Louis Vuitton to Hedi Slimane’s aviator and leather clad Celine gang, we round up our favourite shows from Men’s Fashion Week Spring Summer 2020.

In the details.

ACNE STUDIOS
Acne Studios embraced a more adventurous spirit this season, with transparent vests, fringed ponchos and fine knits worn over printed shirts accompanying the label’s signature tailored suiting.

BODE
Inspired by her family’s heritage, designer Emily Adams Bode crafted this season’s Bode man out of colourful two-pieces and retro textiles.

CELINE
Hedi Slimane’s sophomore menswear collection was a study of eras past. The 70s, which the designer has long-been fascination by, particularly shaped the slim-cut suit silhouettes, open collar shirting and leather panelled jackets.

Straight to the point.

DIOR MEN
Kim Jones’ Dior man was suited and booted – each model dressed in a variation of precision cut two-pieces and boiler suits with grey or black rubber sole laced boots. Signature CD monograms hung daintily from earrings and key-chains, while the minimalist pastel pink set let the collection do all the talking.

DRIES VAN NOTEN
Forget borrowing from the boys – this was a collection we wanted to buy for ourselves. Low cut blouses tucked into crisp white shorts, leather tanks and leopard bombers, and some of the most covetable prints we’ve seen all season. Be mine.

HERMÈS
The Hermès man is one we want to roll with – impeccably styled with layered shirting, neckties and wide legged trousers. We’ll take the bags too, please.

New balance.

JIL SANDER
Ying met yang for Jil Sander’s SS 20 menswear collection. Monochrome colourways were rendered in relaxed suiting, with floor length fringing appearing throughout.

J.W.ANDERSON
Craftsmanship and attention to detail is synonymous with J.W.Anderson – and this collection was no different. Knitwear featured across tops, shorts and accessories, with felted clogs carrying models from this world into the next.

KENZO
Water world. Inspired by the sea, Carol Lim and Humberto Leon’s final collection for Kenzo was formed around the female free divers in Japan – and the clothes followed suit. Tailored neoprene met mermaid iconography for a wardrobe that had us yearning for an ocean escape.

LANVIN
Holiday, celebrate. That was the Lanvin motto for Spring Summer 2020. An ode to the utopia of summer, the mood was light (as was the colour palette), with a frayed knitted two-piece we were ready to take home for ourselves.

Off the grid.

LOEWE
Jonathan Anderson’s Loewe collection is the one we want to be wearing when we finally decide to abandon our day-to-day grind and live à la the free spirits of the Balearic Islands. Suede caftans and knee length knits forever.

LOUIS VUITTON
Virgil Abloh took a decidedly softer approach to his Louis Vuitton SS 20 collection, with pale blue, lavender and lemon sorbet coloured pieces accented by wildflowers and back-dropped by Paris’ Place Dauphine.

OFF-WHITE
Abloh called on contemporary artist Futura to customise the opening and closing looks for Off-White’s collection, as models walked the carnation-lined runway in 90s skater-inspired looks and sheer plastic raincoats (a nod to the climate crisis).

Love me tender.

SIES MARJAN
Paris’ Opera Bastille was the setting for Sander Lak’s first menswear collection, a study in male sexuality beyond the gaze of “pure testosterone and sleaze, showcasing garments that were sensual, with sweeping boat necklines and soft layers. A wardrobe for the modern man.

VALENTINO
Seventies acid prints and fringed ponchos formed Valentino’s menswear collection this season. Beaded turquoise necklaces beside cross-body mini bags layered over neon coloured shirting and butter soft leather. Take us to Joshua Tree.

Y-PROJECT
We came for the tracksuits but stayed for the suiting – oversized with wide lapels, cross-body buttons and perfectly straight cut trousers. Smooth criminals, indeed.