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17 Indigenous businesses to support this January

Indigenous Australian businesses

In the lead up to January 26, many of us are looking and searching for ways we can provide meaningful support, and be an effective ally to First Nations people.

One of the key ways you can you show your allyship is through actively supporting Indigenous-owned or run businesses - now and beyond. Of course, this is just one piece of a very large puzzle. There are many more nuanced discussions and important legislative decisions that need to be had before we reach a place of true reconciliation. But shopping with; buying from and supporting Indigenous business can assist in returning a level of autonomy that has been stripped away from our First Nations people.

Below, find 17 Indigenous creators, innovators and businesses you can support now and in the future.

Clothing the Gap

 

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Haus of Dizzy

Rachel Sarra

 

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Gammin Threads

 

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Little Black Duck

Bush Medijina 

 

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Liandra Swim

 

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Ginny's Girl Gang

MAARA Collective

 

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Earth Jiinda

 

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Nungala Creative

 

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YHI Collective

 

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Lakkari Art

 

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Deadly Denim 

 

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North

 

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Ngarru Miimi

Indii Swimwear

 

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This is by no means an exhaustive list.

There are plenty of other amazing Indigenous creators, Indigenous designers and businesses out there. Supply Nation is an excellent resource to help you discover more.

Other things you can do to show your support

Educate yourself on Indigenous issues

The burden should not be on our First Nations peoples to educate others. We need to do the work ourselves. Read articles and books. Watch Indigenous films. Listen to podcasts or talks.

Education is a key part of breaking down barriers and this is something we all need to do more of. Being a better ally involves unlearning the system we have benefited from for far too long. It involves holding both ourselves and those around us accountable when we witness injustice – beginning a dialogue that is beneficial to both parties. If you're unsure where to begin, here are some tangible ways you can start talking to your family and friends about racism.

 

Give up your time

The last year has been a financially difficult one for many people. If you're not in a position to donate financially, you can always give your time instead.

Volunteering for charitable organisations or offering your assistance where you can to support anti-racism organisations is often just as valuable as a financial donation. Part of the fight for equality involves educating ourselves on the issues First Nations people face on a daily basis and at a grass roots level. If you are wanting to do your part, we recommend getting in touch with organisations such as ANTaR, Indigenous Social Justice Association and The National Justice Project among many others.

 

Write to your local MP

We all know that much of the change that needs to happen for us to reach a stage of healing has to occur on a government and legislative level. Your local member of parliament is supposed to represent the views and feelings of the people in your area. So let them know exactly how you feel. Write to them; a key part of their job is reading and answering letters from their local government area.

In order to get the best response, keep your letter polite but firm. Use your MP's correct title and lay your words out clearly. Let them know what change you want, whether it's changing the date of Australia Day or action on other social and human rights issues. Encourage your friends to write in too. The more voices, the louder the chorus.

 

Like, share, comment

If you think a certain post or comment on social media deserves to be seen, remember to like, share and comment. Your interaction with this post can help it gain momentum. Social media networks are controlled by algorithms that can recognise engagement. Your engagement with a post essentially tells the algorithm to show that post to more people.

So, get tapping on that like button and show your support for charities, businesses and movements that you want to be seen and heard.

 

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Image: Liandra Swim, Gammin Threads